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Have We Made Any Progress Since Brown v. Board of Ed? Not In My Experience.

In 1951, a class action suit was filed against the Board of Education in Topeka, Kansas in the United States District Court for the District of Kansas. The plaintiffs were thirteen Topeka parents on behalf of their 20 children.  What a strong example of parental engagement this landmark case models for us, right? This case… Continue reading Have We Made Any Progress Since Brown v. Board of Ed? Not In My Experience.

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What Should Teachers Know About How Mass Incarceration Intersects With The Classroom?

Our guest today is Whitney Q. Hollins. She is a special educator in the NYC DOE, a Research Assistant at We Got Us Now and a doctoral student at C.U.N.Y. Graduate Center. Whitney and I do advocacy work together and what struck me most about her when we first met was her sharp mind. She’s… Continue reading What Should Teachers Know About How Mass Incarceration Intersects With The Classroom?

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Letters from John: My Educational Autobiography

This is a guest blog from my husband, John Dukes. You’ve read his writing before in an ongoing series here at NYST entitled “Letters from John.” Throughout the series, John speaks poignantly, passionately, and truthfully about his journey along the school-to-prison pipeline. John is currently incarcerated and is enrolled in Mercy College. He had an assignment… Continue reading Letters from John: My Educational Autobiography

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How Deeply Do You Think About Language?

“I’m having a hard time getting through this because of the language. The constant referral to incarcerated individuals as inmates speaks to the inhumane vantage point from which they are viewed by society. Imagine if we all were forever referred to by the result of our worst decision in life?” This was my response to… Continue reading How Deeply Do You Think About Language?

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When My Kids Cry out, “Yo, Mister! Connect the dots!” I Know I’m Doing My Job

(Glenn Mason is a former CPA who spent over 25 years in a variety of roles in corporate America. He is presently a New York City public high school teacher. This is in his twelfth academic year in his newfound career and his second guest post with New York School Talk. Glenn’s first post is… Continue reading When My Kids Cry out, “Yo, Mister! Connect the dots!” I Know I’m Doing My Job

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African-American Pedagogical Experts Are What This Surge Of Student Social Activists Needs!

Last week, the nation watched as students from across the United States walked out of their school buildings and took their voices to loudspeakers and microphones as they spoke their truth about the negative ways gun violence in our schools affects them. My building principal recognized early on that students were going to participate in… Continue reading African-American Pedagogical Experts Are What This Surge Of Student Social Activists Needs!

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In 2018, Books With Diverse Characters Still Few And Far Between At Local New York City Book Drive

Six years ago my mentor, Mercedes Muller, informed me about a local NYC book drive that gives away books to teachers who work in Title One schools that serve many low-income students. Every year since then, I have greatly benefited from the books I receive. Working in schools in communities that struggle economically has made… Continue reading In 2018, Books With Diverse Characters Still Few And Far Between At Local New York City Book Drive

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Educators and Professional Development: Quality Versus Quantity

I must say, I’m very grateful for the pre-service training that I received as a student preparing to be a teacher and in the early years of my career when I was a substitute and leave replacement teacher. My professors, cooperating teachers, and the department chairs that supervised me all embedded and modeled for me… Continue reading Educators and Professional Development: Quality Versus Quantity

New York City

Don’t Just Complain: Say Something!

Do you have something to say — complain, praise, probe — about New York City public schools? Now’s your chance!  Each year, all parents, teachers, and students in grades 6-12 have the opportunity to take the NYC School Survey. The survey is aligned to the DOE’s Framework for Great Schools and designed to collect important information about… Continue reading Don’t Just Complain: Say Something!

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It’s Time That The White Men NYC Students Have Been Forever Learning About Move to the Rear of the Curriculum

On the heels of the end of Black History Month in February, we begin Women’s History Month in March. I guess as a Black woman this is my prime time of year, huh? Not. The best time of year to learn about the contributions that Black people and women have made to American History is… Continue reading It’s Time That The White Men NYC Students Have Been Forever Learning About Move to the Rear of the Curriculum