admissions · homeschooling · NYC high school · NYC Parent Voices · Parents Helping Parents · STEM Education

I Don’t Know Where My Son Is Applying To College: Why That’s (Kind Of) OK With Me

When my oldest son was applying to college five years ago, he kept me posted every step of the way. Mostly because he kept asking for my debit card to pay various application fees. I also read many, many – many! – drafts of his essay, to the point where we still quote excerpts to… Continue reading I Don’t Know Where My Son Is Applying To College: Why That’s (Kind Of) OK With Me

Gifted & Talented · New York City · NYC Election · NYC high school · NYC Kindergarten · NYC Schools · Teaching in NYC

NYC, Meet the New School Chancellor: What This Means For Your Child

Outgoing New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio hasn’t had a lot of luck with his School Chancellors. His first pick, Carmen Farina, opened multiple Dual Language programs… but barely lasted through de Blasio’s first term. His second, Alberto Carvalho, accepted the job, then backed out at the last minute – on live television. He… Continue reading NYC, Meet the New School Chancellor: What This Means For Your Child

Accountability · NYC high school · NYC Parent Voices · NYC Schools · Parents Helping Parents

“Make Them Show You the Rule”… and Other Tips For Dealing With the NYC School System

My daughter took Algebra 1 in 8th grade. (This despite New York City remaining unsure whether that was a good or a bad thing.) She did not take the Algebra 1 Regents exam, however, due to the pandemic. Her school didn’t offer the exam, and no public school would allow her into the building to… Continue reading “Make Them Show You the Rule”… and Other Tips For Dealing With the NYC School System

admissions · arts in schools · Educational Equity · NYC high school · NYC School Admissions · screened nyc schools · specialized high schools

It Cost More To Get My Kids Into Public Art Than Specialized High School (Why Aren’t More People Upset About That?)

In a non-Covid year, New York City 8th graders (and a small number of 9th graders) take the Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT) and audition for arts high schools like LaGuardia, Frank Sinatra, Talent Unlimited, etc… in the fall. In a non-Covid year, only teens who relocated to NYC after the deadline are allowed… Continue reading It Cost More To Get My Kids Into Public Art Than Specialized High School (Why Aren’t More People Upset About That?)

arts in schools · NYC high school · NYC Teacher · NYC Teacher Voices · Outstanding NYC Teachers

You Don’t Have to Reinvent the Wheel, You Just Have to Learn to be a Great Driver: A Teacher’s Graduation Advice To Students

(This is a guest post by Joseph S. Lento, a licensed Teacher of Orchestral Music and School District Administration. In 2014, President Obama named him a National Teacher of Arts and Humanities. Joseph also has commendations from Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush. In 1999, he was named NYC Public Schools Bronx County… Continue reading You Don’t Have to Reinvent the Wheel, You Just Have to Learn to be a Great Driver: A Teacher’s Graduation Advice To Students

admissions · NYC high school · NYC Parent Voices · NYC School Admissions · School Choice · screened nyc schools

Choosing My Daughter’s High School To Please Mayor DeBlasio

Regular readers of New York School Talk know how important Mayor Bill de Blasio’s approval is to this NYC mom. Hizzoner was most displeased with the high-school choices I made for my two older sons. I have only my daughter left. This is my last chance to get it right! When trying to figure out… Continue reading Choosing My Daughter’s High School To Please Mayor DeBlasio

Advanced Placement · Educational Equity · NYC high school

A Brooklyn School Working to Help Students Share Their Own Voices

(This is a guest post by Natasha Cherry-Perez, Senior Associate Director of Community Engagement at Uncommon Schools and super Mom to an outstanding high school student.) In middle school, Ruth Kendall remembered the mathematical expression Pi (3.14) all the way out to 400 digits. She loves numbers so much, the Uncommon Collegiate Charter High School… Continue reading A Brooklyn School Working to Help Students Share Their Own Voices

admissions · NYC high school · NYC School Admissions · Parents Helping Parents · School Choice · School Waitlists · screened nyc schools

How NYC School Waitlists Work – And How They Don’t

Waitlists had long been a fact of life for New York City Kindergarten and Gifted & Talented admissions, Hunter College Elementary, and other public charter schools. But Mayor Bill De Blasio only added them to middle and high school admissions in 2019. (Previously, there had been a Second Round for teens who didn’t get any… Continue reading How NYC School Waitlists Work – And How They Don’t

admissions · Finding the Right School · NYC high school · NYC School Admissions · Parents Helping Parents · School Waitlists · specialized high schools

Why NYC High School Admissions Will Be Very Different This Year: How Families Can Make It Better

New York City families who applied to private high schools this year were obliged to turn in their enrollment contracts — and put down a deposit on tuition — by noon of last Friday, March 12, 2021. In previous years, NYC Specialized, Screened, Arts, Ed-Opt, P-Tech, and all other public high schools would also notify… Continue reading Why NYC High School Admissions Will Be Very Different This Year: How Families Can Make It Better

admissions · DOE incompetence · Gifted & Talented · NYC high school · NYC Kindergarten · NYC middle school · NYC School Admissions · screened nyc schools

Sound and Fury, Signifying Nothing: NYC Mayor Bill DeBlasio’s Education Legacy

As a whopping 40+(!) candidates gear up to run for Mayor of New York City, we thought we’d take a comprehensive look at the education legacy of Gracie Mansion’s current occupant. Bill de Blasio was sworn in as NYC’s 109th Mayor on January 1, 2014. He told a Tale of Two Cities and promised to… Continue reading Sound and Fury, Signifying Nothing: NYC Mayor Bill DeBlasio’s Education Legacy