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My Student Asked Me If I Was Racist So I Told the Truth and Said Yes.

This is a guest post by my friend and colleague Zachary Wright, a national finalist for the United States Department of Education’s School Ambassador Fellowship and 2013 Philadelphia Teacher of the Year. Now he is an assistant professor of practice at Relay Graduate School of Education serving Philadelphia and Camden. Prior to that, he was the… Continue reading My Student Asked Me If I Was Racist So I Told the Truth and Said Yes.

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Spider-Man and Sen. Kamala Harris Show How Every Kid Can Be a Hero

This is a guest post by from friend and colleague Rob Samuelson, who is a digital media associate at Education Post, with a background in political writing. This piece first appeared here at Education Post. There’s an old cliche about Spider-Man: He’s arguably pop culture’s favorite superhero because his mask covers his whole face. This means,… Continue reading Spider-Man and Sen. Kamala Harris Show How Every Kid Can Be a Hero

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This Teacher Brings Broadway into His Classroom! “Hamilton,” Anyone?

For me there’s something inspirational and informative when you weave together music  and dance in order to convey meaning. While I’ve been told that I can’t sing or dance (haters), I think I’ve learned a thing or two from Broadway musicals. Man of La Mancha depicts Europe during The Middle Ages. Ragtime the Musical presents… Continue reading This Teacher Brings Broadway into His Classroom! “Hamilton,” Anyone?

Finding the Right School · School Choice

New Year, Old NYC School Argument

Kindergarten Connect, the form New York City parents use to apply their children to public school Kindergarten for September 2019, is scheduled to close on Monday, January 14th, although on-going problems with the “new and improved” online Parent Portal may cause the deadline to be pushed back due to technical difficulties. To help parents know… Continue reading New Year, Old NYC School Argument

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The Trauma-Informed Classroom: Six Years After The Sandy Hook Massacre

Yesterday in one of my classes, an announcement came over the loudspeaker informing students that the bathrooms were closed and that they needed to remain in their classrooms. Upon hearing that, I locked the front classroom door. It was an instinctual response to the directive given. As I locked the door, my students asked me… Continue reading The Trauma-Informed Classroom: Six Years After The Sandy Hook Massacre

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Black Kids Don’t Need a Handout or a Shortcut, They Just Need Schools That Work.

This is a post by my friend and colleague Tanesha Peeples,the Deputy Director of Outreach for Education Post. Her mission is to use her education, passion and experience to empower marginalized populations. Born and raised on Chicago’s South Side, she is a Chicago Public Schools alumna and proud Englewoodian. Check out her blogging about “Hope and… Continue reading Black Kids Don’t Need a Handout or a Shortcut, They Just Need Schools That Work.

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SURPRISE! Teaching Is Serious Business — At Least Most of the Time.

A Total Surprise: “Are you going to wear that again on Friday?” Debbie asked me one afternoon. An odd sort of a question I thought, especially coming from Debbie. Everyone knows that I wear a white shirt and black pants to school every day. This was our school uniform at the time. The kids were… Continue reading SURPRISE! Teaching Is Serious Business — At Least Most of the Time.

School Choice

Rekindling the Heritage of an Unconquered Indian Tribe

This post is by Joy Prescott, a fourth-grade math teacher at Pemayetv Emahakv Charter School in Florida and the 2019 Florida Department of Education Teacher of the Year. It was originally published at National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. Over the course of almost two centuries, Florida’s Seminoles endured three wars with the U.S. government, resisted numerous… Continue reading Rekindling the Heritage of an Unconquered Indian Tribe

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The Life-Changing Benefits of Black Teachers for Black Students

Last week I wrote a very personal post about the connections between our nation’s education and criminal justice systems. I was accused by a reader of not grounding my assertions in research, thus voiding my post’s truth or relevance. I reminded the reader that I’d written a blog post, not a research paper. However, this… Continue reading The Life-Changing Benefits of Black Teachers for Black Students

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A Personal Perspective Into The School-To-Prison Pipeline: John Is Home!

On Tuesday, October 30th, I received one of the greatest gifts of my life: After serving 19 and a half years of a 20-to-life sentence, my husband John Dukes was released from prison. Each day he’s home is a blessing. Each day he’s home also highlights the challenges that formerly incarcerated people face along their… Continue reading A Personal Perspective Into The School-To-Prison Pipeline: John Is Home!