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“I Want to Talk About Better Academic and Life Outcomes for Black and Brown Kids. Period.”

(This was first published at Education Post.) If we have really well-prepared young people who are going to the exact college they want to go to, who will graduate from college within six years with little to no debt and who are willing to take over the dining hall and stage a protest or to… Continue reading “I Want to Talk About Better Academic and Life Outcomes for Black and Brown Kids. Period.”

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“Implying That Black and Hispanic Kids Only Do Better When They’re In School With White Kids Is Racist.” A NYC Mom Speaks Out.

When news dropped late last month (literally 10 minutes before my middle child’s birthday dinner) about a proposal to get rid of New York City’s Gifted & Talented programs, The NY Daily News asked me to write an editorial on the topic. It ran on August 27 and was entitled, Eliminate Gifted & Talented Programs?… Continue reading “Implying That Black and Hispanic Kids Only Do Better When They’re In School With White Kids Is Racist.” A NYC Mom Speaks Out.

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An Impassioned Plea For The Purposeful Hiring of More Black Teachers

Why is it a problem for some when academic spaces are comprised of more Black teachers than White teachers? I continue to be baffled by the resistance to this change, especially from White teachers. The reality is that many Black teachers function in predominantly White academic spaces for the entirety of our careers, often without… Continue reading An Impassioned Plea For The Purposeful Hiring of More Black Teachers

Finding the Right School

NYC Schools Of Choice: Then and Now

In my 2017 post, Beyond the Zone: All Your NYC Elementary School Options (And How To Get Them) Explained, I mentioned Deborah Meier as someone who didn’t believe that the primarily African-American and Hispanic families of Harlem should be forced to settle for the education their zoned public schools were offering. In 1974, she founded… Continue reading NYC Schools Of Choice: Then and Now

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The My Brother’s Keeper Movement in New York State and the Audacious Goal of Success for All

                                                              This is a guest post by Dr. Anael Alston, who was born and raised in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. “Dr. A” is currently the Assistant Commissioner for the Office of Access, Equity and Community Engagement in the New York State Education Department. “I am…” declared Michael D. Smith. “My Brother’s Keeper!” nearly 500 young men of color… Continue reading The My Brother’s Keeper Movement in New York State and the Audacious Goal of Success for All

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Lean In. The Disruption Has Begun.

In Thursday’s post, I indicated that racism, bias, and discrimination are as much a part of our educational system in New York as they are in any other formal institution. Although some would like to quench the thirst of those — like me — who are eager to expose and eradicate the misery of this… Continue reading Lean In. The Disruption Has Begun.

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The NYC DOE Has Racism Coursing Through Its Veins and Carranza Is Trying To Do Something About It. Why the Pushback?: Part 1.

City kids are struggling with basic math and English — but a new Department of Education curricular initiative focuses instead on racial privilege and activism, The Post has learned. As soon as I read this opening sentence of this NY Post article, I was completely taken aback. Racial privilege? Activism? What — you mean activating… Continue reading The NYC DOE Has Racism Coursing Through Its Veins and Carranza Is Trying To Do Something About It. Why the Pushback?: Part 1.

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In Yonkers, Teachers Leaders Are “The Unit Of Change”: A Report From the Field.

“What if kids who look like me didn’t have to work so hard to navigate an inequitable school system? What if adults were invested in making that navigation possible?” That’s Tracy Fray-Oliver, Associate Vice President of Bank Street Education Center (part of the Bank Street College of Education in New York City) speaking to a… Continue reading In Yonkers, Teachers Leaders Are “The Unit Of Change”: A Report From the Field.

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I’m Afraid I Will Have To Abandon My Educational Journey: A Student Speaks.

I met Xavier at the EDXEDNYC conference on my birthday last year. As the shirt he’s wearing in his photo illustrates, he was a student volunteer and his true spirit of service shone bright. He helped me set up for my conference, showed me where lunch was being held, and answered all of my questions.… Continue reading I’m Afraid I Will Have To Abandon My Educational Journey: A Student Speaks.

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Dwayne Dinkins’ Story of Struggle and Perseverance As, Against All Odds, He Makes It To College.

This is a guest post by Dwayne Dinkins, a senior at Uncommon Collegiate Charter High School. He will graduate next month having taken 7 AP exams. When I first came to high school four years ago, I wasn’t confident in my potential success because of a number of really difficult circumstances at home. But yesterday… Continue reading Dwayne Dinkins’ Story of Struggle and Perseverance As, Against All Odds, He Makes It To College.