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Have I Been A Victim of Racism In My School? How Do I Develop the Ability To Spark Change? A Black Girl Speaks Out.

This is a guest post by Jade Arielle Bolden, a 15-year-old student at the College Preparatory Academy in Houston, Texas. She was born on Long Island and aspires to move back to New York and attend Columbia University. She runs track, is part of Voices of Black Youth (an organization run by her her school), and… Continue reading Have I Been A Victim of Racism In My School? How Do I Develop the Ability To Spark Change? A Black Girl Speaks Out.

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The Case for Afrocentric Schools: Can Traditional Schools Fairly Serve “Distinct” Students?

This is a guest post by Kraig Knibb, a doctoral student at Stony Brook University in the School of Social Welfare. He is a social justice researcher, with a specific focus on education, culture, and power  among students of African-American descent. He attributes his penchant for social justice to his Panamanian mother and his emphasis on… Continue reading The Case for Afrocentric Schools: Can Traditional Schools Fairly Serve “Distinct” Students?

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I Think We Have Integrated Ourselves into Oblivion

On Valentine’s Day when we celebrate love, it’s hard for me to wrap my mind around where the love could have possibly been in the hearts and minds of the teachers who allowed nooses to be displayed in their Long Island middle school classrooms. According to The Grio and several other news source outlets, “Three… Continue reading I Think We Have Integrated Ourselves into Oblivion

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Mental Illness in Our Schools: A National Crisis

Of the 55 million students who attend U.S. schools, 46 percent will experience a mental health disorder in their lifetime. And one in five of our young people live with a mental health condition, but less than half receive treatment. These are staggering statistics that speak volumes about an epidemic facing our school children, especially… Continue reading Mental Illness in Our Schools: A National Crisis

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The Trauma-Informed Classroom: Six Years After The Sandy Hook Massacre

Yesterday in one of my classes, an announcement came over the loudspeaker informing students that the bathrooms were closed and that they needed to remain in their classrooms. Upon hearing that, I locked the front classroom door. It was an instinctual response to the directive given. As I locked the door, my students asked me… Continue reading The Trauma-Informed Classroom: Six Years After The Sandy Hook Massacre

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What Does Airing The Louisiana Landry School’s Dirty Laundry Mean For The Rest Of Us?

The narrative earned Mr. Sassau acceptance to St. John’s University in New York. There was one problem: None of it was true. “I was just a small piece in a whole fathom of lies,” Mr. Sassau said. I read this statement in in the New York Times when a colleague sent it to me and I… Continue reading What Does Airing The Louisiana Landry School’s Dirty Laundry Mean For The Rest Of Us?

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SURPRISE! Teaching Is Serious Business — At Least Most of the Time.

A Total Surprise: “Are you going to wear that again on Friday?” Debbie asked me one afternoon. An odd sort of a question I thought, especially coming from Debbie. Everyone knows that I wear a white shirt and black pants to school every day. This was our school uniform at the time. The kids were… Continue reading SURPRISE! Teaching Is Serious Business — At Least Most of the Time.

School Choice

Rekindling the Heritage of an Unconquered Indian Tribe

This post is by Joy Prescott, a fourth-grade math teacher at Pemayetv Emahakv Charter School in Florida and the 2019 Florida Department of Education Teacher of the Year. It was originally published at National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. Over the course of almost two centuries, Florida’s Seminoles endured three wars with the U.S. government, resisted numerous… Continue reading Rekindling the Heritage of an Unconquered Indian Tribe

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Family Engagement: The Missing Link to School Reform

Danielle Asher is the Director of Curriculum and Training for Family Leadership Network, a division of the social justice nonprofit, Choice For All in Roosevelt, NY. Ms. Asher works with families and communities to shift the culture of what leadership looks like while working towards anti-racist and equitable systemic change. Danielle works locally and nationally to… Continue reading Family Engagement: The Missing Link to School Reform

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The Life-Changing Benefits of Black Teachers for Black Students

Last week I wrote a very personal post about the connections between our nation’s education and criminal justice systems. I was accused by a reader of not grounding my assertions in research, thus voiding my post’s truth or relevance. I reminded the reader that I’d written a blog post, not a research paper. However, this… Continue reading The Life-Changing Benefits of Black Teachers for Black Students