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A Teacher Must Speak: Poetry of Diversity

From the moment I began my journey towards becoming a teacher, diversity in education has been at the forefront of my decision-making. One of my biggest concerns has always been not what I wanted to teach, but who I wanted to teach — privileged White kids or underprivileged kids of color. Both demographics need exposure to… Continue reading A Teacher Must Speak: Poetry of Diversity

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Letters from John: Hiding in Plain Sight

This is Part 4 of my series “Letters from John.” In Part I, I wrote, “I’m in a beautifully loving marriage to John Dukes, a man who is truly one of the greatest human beings I’ve ever had the pleasure to know. My husband is also incarcerated. During our friendship, courtship, and marriage, John and I… Continue reading Letters from John: Hiding in Plain Sight

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Letters from John, Part 3: The School-to-Prison Pipeline: “I Saw Nothing and No One in School That Resembled Me”

[This is Part 3 of my series of “Letters from John.”In  Part I  I wrote, “I’m in a beautifully loving marriage to John Dukes, a man who is truly one of the greatest human beings I’ve ever had the pleasure to know. My husband is also incarcerated. During our friendship, courtship, and marriage, John and… Continue reading Letters from John, Part 3: The School-to-Prison Pipeline: “I Saw Nothing and No One in School That Resembled Me”

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“I Was Becoming One of Those People I Despise”: A NYC Teacher Reflects on Her Own Racial Biases

As a teacher I’m so humbled and thankful to be able to shape the formation of young, viable minds for a living. The student-teacher relationship that I’m sharing with you in this week’s blog post is particularly special to me because it has forever informed my pedagogical views on the profound impact of not only… Continue reading “I Was Becoming One of Those People I Despise”: A NYC Teacher Reflects on Her Own Racial Biases

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“At Ten Years Old,” Said My Son, “I Know that Our Justice System is Not Just”

As I sit in the corner of a corridor in KIPP Infinity Elementary School, a heaviness consumes me. A KIPP parent’s life has been taken senselessly because he was described as a “bad dude.” Can anyone tell me what a “bad dude” looks like? Terence Crutcher was a black man, a father of four, one… Continue reading “At Ten Years Old,” Said My Son, “I Know that Our Justice System is Not Just”