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What’s On Your Book Shelf?: The Importance of Diversity in Classroom Libraries

I was allotted some funds for the purpose of further developing my classroom library. Books are my happy place so I was overjoyed! I set out on the task with the express purpose of not only getting books that met the varying reading levels of my students, but also books that represented the cultures of… Continue reading What’s On Your Book Shelf?: The Importance of Diversity in Classroom Libraries

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Teaching Historical Inaccuracies Is Dangerous and Damning to Both Black and White Students.

There’s this narrative floating around regarding slavery in the United States that is gravely inaccurate. These inaccuracies are both dangerous and damning to our nationally collective remembrance of our past, the very racially-charged country in which we currently live, and the hope for a one-day- post-racial future that we suggest to our students each day… Continue reading Teaching Historical Inaccuracies Is Dangerous and Damning to Both Black and White Students.

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“Take a look at yourself, and then make a change”: In the Wake of Charlottesville, a Teacher Contemplates Bias

I applaud my fellow educational allies who have begun to assemble curriculum resources. I encourage you to follow #CharlotttesvilleCurriculum on social media as it can lead you to an array of resources and subsequently increase awareness of what schools are encouraging. The voices of classroom teachers are also amplified. At the same time, it’s essential… Continue reading “Take a look at yourself, and then make a change”: In the Wake of Charlottesville, a Teacher Contemplates Bias

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“I Am Not Your Nigger”: Racial Slurs Run Amok in Schools Across America

When I went on break today and checked my Facebook page, I began reading the usual stories of love, tragedy, comedy, politics, and spirituality that run the gamut of my feed. However, my jaw dropped when I read this post. (I’ve deleted names to protect privacy.) Got a call from the deans office at my… Continue reading “I Am Not Your Nigger”: Racial Slurs Run Amok in Schools Across America

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Don’t Tell Me My Child Can’t Learn. Because She Can.

(Guest post by Teresena Wright) My parents — and by that I mean the families with whom I work —  ask me all the time, “how did you get started in this line work?” My journey began like this… I tell them that, for me, it started 13 years ago. Yes, my children are the most… Continue reading Don’t Tell Me My Child Can’t Learn. Because She Can.

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YOU HAVE NO BUSINESS TEACHING CHILDREN!!!!

I don’t know why but I find myself monitoring and questioning my voice a lot these days –too much, I think. I’m so cautious about not being pigeonholed as another “Angry Black Woman,” but I can’t worry about all of that political correctness because the truth is that there is nothing correct about what’s going… Continue reading YOU HAVE NO BUSINESS TEACHING CHILDREN!!!!

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Teachers Can’t Just Be Teachers To Their Students

Yesterday my daughter Cereta sat down next to me as I was writing and just started talking. “Teachers,” she said, “can’t just be teachers to their students. They have to be friends to them, too. Teachers who are too much into authority can cause their students to find them unrelatable and unapproachable.” Clearly she had… Continue reading Teachers Can’t Just Be Teachers To Their Students

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Thinking Beyond the Traditional Concept of What Constitutes an English Language Learner

In September, I eagerly started taking the coursework necessary to become an English as a Second Language  teacher, a lifelong goal of mine. During my very first class, the professor asked a series of poignant questions about factors that influence practitioners’ teaching that stirred up something in me. Firstly, how does information influence how I… Continue reading Thinking Beyond the Traditional Concept of What Constitutes an English Language Learner

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NY High School Student Reflects On Trump’s Election: We’ll See Setbacks in Education Reform and Increases in Overt Racism

I am a seventeen-year-old senior at Port Chester High School, an Italian-American  lower middle-class educated female. And I just watched my country burn to the ground on November 8th, 2016. It’s strange to think that our daily lives didn’t stop for this. I still ate lunch, went to work, bought groceries. There is a quiet… Continue reading NY High School Student Reflects On Trump’s Election: We’ll See Setbacks in Education Reform and Increases in Overt Racism

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I’m Not Your “Boo”: The Politics of Language

Linguist Jane H. Hill, in an article entitled “Now That White People Have Declared ‘Bae’ Over, Black People Can Use it In Peace,” defines language appropriation as “a type of complex cultural borrowing that involves a dominant group’s ‘theft’ of aspects of a target group’s language.” Hill explains that the “theft” adds value to White… Continue reading I’m Not Your “Boo”: The Politics of Language