Accountability · Blog

Can We Just Trade Betsy for LeBron?

This is a guest post by my friend and colleague Tanesha Peeples, the Deputy Director of Outreach for Education Post. She was born and raised on the South Side of Chicago, is a Chicago Public Schools alumna and proud Englewoodian. She blogs about Hope and Outrage. OUTRAGE: SOMEBODY NEEDS TO GET BETSY I’m so tired of Betsy… Continue reading Can We Just Trade Betsy for LeBron?

Blog

Schools Are Some of The Most Racist Places on Earth

CNN recently reported about yet another culturally insensitive assignment given to students in an eighth-grade U.S. history class at a charter school in Texas. There, students were told to complete an assignment on the “positive aspects” and “negative aspects” of the life of slaves, giving a “balanced view.” This assignment wreaks of micro-aggressive and racist… Continue reading Schools Are Some of The Most Racist Places on Earth

Blog · Finding the Right School · School Choice

Wesley’s Story, Part II: “You’re Telling Me That a Child in a Wheelchair Would Be Denied a Ramp?”

Back in February I interviewed Kim Williams Clark about her heroic efforts to create an inclusive education for her son Wesley, a lively, loving, and artistic nine-year-old with Down Syndrome. When the family lived in Montclair, New Jersey, Wesley was fully included with his typical peers. The family’s move to Brooklyn Heights was based on… Continue reading Wesley’s Story, Part II: “You’re Telling Me That a Child in a Wheelchair Would Be Denied a Ramp?”

Blog

How Deeply Do You Think About Language?

“I’m having a hard time getting through this because of the language. The constant referral to incarcerated individuals as inmates speaks to the inhumane vantage point from which they are viewed by society. Imagine if we all were forever referred to by the result of our worst decision in life?” This was my response to… Continue reading How Deeply Do You Think About Language?

Blog

In 2018, Books With Diverse Characters Still Few And Far Between At Local New York City Book Drive

Six years ago my mentor, Mercedes Muller, informed me about a local NYC book drive that gives away books to teachers who work in Title One schools that serve many low-income students. Every year since then, I have greatly benefited from the books I receive. Working in schools in communities that struggle economically has made… Continue reading In 2018, Books With Diverse Characters Still Few And Far Between At Local New York City Book Drive

Blog

It’s Time That The White Men NYC Students Have Been Forever Learning About Move to the Rear of the Curriculum

On the heels of the end of Black History Month in February, we begin Women’s History Month in March. I guess as a Black woman this is my prime time of year, huh? Not. The best time of year to learn about the contributions that Black people and women have made to American History is… Continue reading It’s Time That The White Men NYC Students Have Been Forever Learning About Move to the Rear of the Curriculum

Blog

I’m So Scared For My Black Students

I’m so scared for my Black students. I can’t speak about any other demographic. I work with Black students every day and I am so scared about what I see. More and more they seem less and less interested in academic endeavors. We talk so much about having more technology in the classroom but today… Continue reading I’m So Scared For My Black Students

Blog

A Culturally-Responsive Education For NYC Students Is No Longer Optional! It Is A Must!

New York City schools are plagued with deeply embedded racist practices and ideologies. From the huge disparity in the amount of teachers of color hired in comparison to their White counterparts, to the lack of diversity and inclusion of the vast contributions of all groups, not just White people, to the building of this country… Continue reading A Culturally-Responsive Education For NYC Students Is No Longer Optional! It Is A Must!

Accountability · Blog · Finding the Right School · School Choice

“As A Parent, You Want to Cry. As A Lawyer, You Want to Sue.” A Special Needs Mom Fights for Her Son’s Inclusion in his Brooklyn School.

Nine-year-old Wesley Clark is a fourth-grader at PS 8 in Brooklyn Heights. He and his family were recently profiled in the New York Post, which described PS 8 as a “supposedly progressive” public school “that talks a good game about inclusion but is purposely neglecting their child to try to get him to leave.”  Could this… Continue reading “As A Parent, You Want to Cry. As A Lawyer, You Want to Sue.” A Special Needs Mom Fights for Her Son’s Inclusion in his Brooklyn School.

Blog

Black Lives Matter. Black Students’ Lives Matter. Black Students’ Lives In NYC Matter: Wait, Hold Up, Not so Fast.

A recent Daily News article entitled “Why Won’t the United Federation of Teachers Sign Onto Black Lives Matter?” reports that, Last week, the union representing the teachers of nearly 300,000 black students rejected a resolution supporting Black Lives Matter in education, making it the only local teachers union to do so among the 10 cities… Continue reading Black Lives Matter. Black Students’ Lives Matter. Black Students’ Lives In NYC Matter: Wait, Hold Up, Not so Fast.