Blog

When NOT Listening To Your Teacher Is The Right Thing To Do: The Christopher Lawrence Story

As an educator, I never truly know the impact that I will have on my students. I just do my best; that’s my standard.  I am concerned, however, and for good reason, that all educators are not doing their best. Consider Christopher Lawrence, who grew up in South Jamaica, is currently a senior at Forest… Continue reading When NOT Listening To Your Teacher Is The Right Thing To Do: The Christopher Lawrence Story

Blog

The Trauma-Informed Classroom: Six Years After The Sandy Hook Massacre

Yesterday in one of my classes, an announcement came over the loudspeaker informing students that the bathrooms were closed and that they needed to remain in their classrooms. Upon hearing that, I locked the front classroom door. It was an instinctual response to the directive given. As I locked the door, my students asked me… Continue reading The Trauma-Informed Classroom: Six Years After The Sandy Hook Massacre

Blog

Black Kids Don’t Need a Handout or a Shortcut, They Just Need Schools That Work.

This is a post by my friend and colleague Tanesha Peeples,the Deputy Director of Outreach for Education Post. Her mission is to use her education, passion and experience to empower marginalized populations. Born and raised on Chicago’s South Side, she is a Chicago Public Schools alumna and proud Englewoodian. Check out her blogging about “Hope and… Continue reading Black Kids Don’t Need a Handout or a Shortcut, They Just Need Schools That Work.

Blog

What Does Airing The Louisiana Landry School’s Dirty Laundry Mean For The Rest Of Us?

The narrative earned Mr. Sassau acceptance to St. John’s University in New York. There was one problem: None of it was true. “I was just a small piece in a whole fathom of lies,” Mr. Sassau said. I read this statement in in the New York Times when a colleague sent it to me and I… Continue reading What Does Airing The Louisiana Landry School’s Dirty Laundry Mean For The Rest Of Us?

Blog

The Life-Changing Benefits of Black Teachers for Black Students

Last week I wrote a very personal post about the connections between our nation’s education and criminal justice systems. I was accused by a reader of not grounding my assertions in research, thus voiding my post’s truth or relevance. I reminded the reader that I’d written a blog post, not a research paper. However, this… Continue reading The Life-Changing Benefits of Black Teachers for Black Students

Blog

A Personal Perspective Into The School-To-Prison Pipeline: John Is Home!

On Tuesday, October 30th, I received one of the greatest gifts of my life: After serving 19 and a half years of a 20-to-life sentence, my husband John Dukes was released from prison. Each day he’s home is a blessing. Each day he’s home also highlights the challenges that formerly incarcerated people face along their… Continue reading A Personal Perspective Into The School-To-Prison Pipeline: John Is Home!

Blog

Looking Past The Attitude: What Black Teachers See In Black Students That Other Teachers Don’t.

The other day I was watching a video on Instagram where a little girl in daycare/pre-kindergarten was telling her teacher how she needs a day off from her (the teacher) and these “kids” that get on her nerves. I was in stitches watching it and I thought to myself, “this little girl is really smart!”… Continue reading Looking Past The Attitude: What Black Teachers See In Black Students That Other Teachers Don’t.

Finding the Right School · School Choice

If You Can’t Teach My Black Children, Admit It and Move On.

Today the New York Times’ Dana Goldstein has an article on a new trend: advocates taking states to court to demand integrated schools. In the piece she quotes one particular education advocate who questions the assumption that integration is a panacea for inequity. That advocate is Khulia Pringle whose daughter attended a St. Paul charter… Continue reading If You Can’t Teach My Black Children, Admit It and Move On.

Blog

My Friend’s Daughter Was Called a “Nigger” Today at Her Summer STEM Camp

My friend’s daughter was called a nigger yesterday at her University of Miami STEM camp. Her angry mother, after experiencing and responding to this event, wrote the following. Toxic white women and toxic white feminism starts as little girls crying crocodile tears on the playground after they deny Black children their humanity. I wish I… Continue reading My Friend’s Daughter Was Called a “Nigger” Today at Her Summer STEM Camp

Blog

Our Passion for Equitable Education Should Match The Passion We Feel For a Starving Child, says SUNY Professor

This week I interviewed Dr. Abena Ampofoa Asare, Assistant Professor of Modern African Affairs at Stony Brook University. Her research and writing spans questions of human rights, citizenship and transformative justice in Africa and the African diaspora.  Her work can be found in The Radical Teacher, The International Journal of Crime, Justice and Social Democracy,… Continue reading Our Passion for Equitable Education Should Match The Passion We Feel For a Starving Child, says SUNY Professor